Tag Archives: LinkedIn

Content cooking: Filet of post with leftovers

4 Jul
Content inventory desserts

The desserts in your content inventory are the well-crafted content that would be appropriate to reference or recycle when it tastes good (trending in the news cycle).

Joan Canning’s guest column in the Toledo Free Press on the complexity of the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) was so good that it deserved a second publishing cycle and a look at a simple content distribution action.

The Toledo Free Press circulated the 700 word article in its May print and online editions. Since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is still a trending topic on Google Trends let’s share the good word on our content hub (blog or main website) and social channels (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube).

Main course: Content Hub

Joan summarized the article on her content hub, her blog HR Advocate, which guides employers through the complexities of employment regulations. The summary on HR Advocate then directed readers to the original source.

Side dishes: Social Channels

She then created a status post on HR Advocate’s Facebook fan page for followers who would not be exposed to the Free Press article but would see the link summary on Facebook.

Moving on to HR Advocate’s Twitter channel, she shared detail on the original article and accompanying information in several tweets.

Having set up automatic posting from the HR Advocate Twitter channel, Joan’s LinkedIn followers were exposed to her excellent content as well via a status post on her LinkedIn profile.

Dessert: Content Inventory

Joan had created a YouTube video on the ACA for the beginning of this year on the HR Advocate’s YouTube channel. With ever-changing regulations affecting the decisions of the small and medium sized businesses that Joan serves, she updated detail in the video – What’s new with the Affordable Care Act in 2012 – in April.

Since she had tackled the same subject (ACA) from a different angle in June – Health care mandate tramples religious liberty – she made sure to link to her earlier efforts and follow the same pattern of sharing her excellent content on her content hub and social channels.

Joan now has these elements (the two articles and the YouTube video) in her content inventory or content matrix, which will come in handy to reference or recycle when the topic peaks again (as it undoubtedly will in this election cycle).

The original article was distributed in print, online publication, blog, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, and that was before sharing and cross linking to other related items in Joan’s content inventory. Great content moved and consumed efficiently with leftovers.

Visualization: Make the elevator go up and down

17 Jan
Introductory elevator speeches have become typical and almost have the opposite effect.

Credit: Roy Luck

I learn by listening to others tell their stories. I learn a lot when people give details of their successes and failures. That saves me a few iterations and unhappy clients.

My local church networking group is struggling with providing the most valuable information for job seekers and networking business people. Introductory elevator speeches have become typical and almost have the opposite effect. I’m not learning anything new that I can share with others. We all get used to positioning our labels and revealing what others might want to hear or what might help us sell.

How about we add a gear to that short statement? “I’m a web project manager.” Now, instead of what I do, how about here’s what I’ve done. “This week I helped build a website that helps this client speak to these people. It has this one great feature. Google it, discover it and try it out.”

Give others something to do, something to imagine. Let them visualize what you do instead of trying to memorize your label.

Build a better college newspaper website

21 Oct

Nationaal Archief

Here’s a checklist of online adjustments and guidance for a better college newspaper website. Change is difficult for newspapers. There are learning curves and time management issues in making these changes, but muscle up and get these done and get your dying newsprint a suitable online channel.

Content Management

  • BBC headlines: Look to bbc.com for guidance on well done news content and presentation. These are excellent examples to follow of keyword forward, densely descriptive but brief headlines. Print headlines do not transition well to online. Snappy headlines that provide information scent (leading people via searches to information results).
  • Direct me to useful information: Not everything is a news story or an enterprise piece. Create content that summarizes stories and group infographics, photos and video. Guide To, How-To, Complete List, etc. is content that people need, want and search for all the time. Anchor this evergreen content in a prominent place on your website and Facebook tabs.
  • Make sure that your RSS feeds are useful. Find a setting in your website’s content management system that not only provides the RSS feed code but links it to the option to add to RSS readers. I’m probably not going to copy the code leave your site and add it to my reader as it is set up currently. Make it one click.
  • Repurpose signed comments from users in a prominent place on the homepage. Anonymous doesn’t cut it. If someone is willing to sign a descriptive username then reward that user with a Comment of the Week feature (with crosslink to the original story). Crosslinks are key – outbound/inbound.
  • PDFs of complete news product: Great (I guess), for a quick scan of the news product and display, but advertisers expect added value and should have a link from their ad. Help your advertisers out.
  • All stories need images (entry points), calls to action (what do I do next?), and crosslinks and other info. Every URL shared on Twitter or Facebook is an introduction to your product. Why stop there?

Facebook for college newspapers

There is typically little engagement on college news Facebook pages. Readers comments on stories to no response. You will gain no value from social media unless you speak to followers. Engage.

Explain coverage: Demystify the news gathering process. Introduce your writers and editors and explain your operation. Tell your story about how you tell stories. This is a great recruiting tool and an opportunity to share with a wider audience.

Follow other people and fan pages: Try to use the @ symbol in all of your status posts. Put your idea and brand on other Facebook fan pages. The @College_Newspaper learned a lot from reporter @SusanMurphy’s visit to @BigUMedicalCenter and @BigUBusinessSchool. Look for stories in the next issue.

Shout out to your follows on the Facebook wall. Use the toggle as fan page administrator to post as both the admin and your personal profile to the your page’s wall. Note the support, interests of friends this way. @Jason Allen probably wasn’t happy with the result of this weekend’s @BigUFootball game, but we have the details on the upcoming game.

YouTube/LinkedIn for college newspapers

Don’t forget your other channels. Complete all profiles with full description and branding. Your YouTube channel needs custom background and profile, while your LinkedIn channel needs a custom profile image.

Twitter for college newspapers

Build source lists on Twitter. Sync your coverage, contacts and followers into your Twitter stream. Spend a little more time to build a better list of followers. Research keywords and geo references related to your university and rake in all sources connected to your university (and competitors, as well). Reporters can ask questions; propose story ideas and crowd source info. Twitter is a listening tool. Use it as a news gathering tool.

It’s expensive to produce that print product. Begin planning your escape plan immediately. Great usable, timely and authoritative information will never go out of style. Find new packaging.

Basic social media explanation

11 May
Social Media core groups

Library of Congress Photo - When someone in your core social group comments on something that you’re interested in that affirmation comes with “social credibility.”

Traditional media broadcasts to very large groups of people hoping that a small percentage of that group responds to their appeal.

When I think about social media I think about a theoretical limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships.  

How many people can you share one additional piece of identifying info? “Oh, I know Janeile, she’s a member of Social Media Breakfast Toledo. Yes, I know Michael, his wife’s name is Amy and they own a small business.”

Dunbar’s Number and your tribe

Dunbar’s Number identifies your core tribe. The number lies somewhere around 100-230. Let’s say 150.

That’s your core social group – 150. When someone in your core social group comments on something that you’re interested in that affirmation comes with “social credibility.” Michael and I are former co-workers. We’ve spent time together, we’ve had lunches.” His comment, appraisal or review of something is elevated by our relationship.

Now Michael has 150 friends in his core. And Janeile is a friend of both Michael and I and she has 150 friends in her core. Now you can see how these social cores can extend indefinitely out to the same range as the big media broadcasters and beyond. My friends and Janeile’s friends and Michael’s friends and all of our friends and their friends add up.

Core on steroids

Now take a good solid social core and put it on steroids? Social Networking channels like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn allow you to develop and strengthen this core group. When you reveal information and insight your core rewards you. It’s good to be affirmed by our social group. This is who we feel comfortable asking questions and making statements and sharing photos and links and ideas.

That’s the power of social media – affirmation, credibility, knowledge. My group makes me smarter and faster. My group has my back.

Can your business provide this type of customer support? Can you make me smarter and faster? Will you watch my back after the sale?

Resume: Social Media’s Role in the Search for Employment and Employees (Part 3)

16 May

What is the value of the traditional resume? What is the value of the LinkedIn resume?

Social Media Breakfast Toledo brought together Don Leith, Kevin Cesarz, Patty Wise and Brandon Croke to examine Social Media’s Role in the Search for Employment and Employees at Thread Information Design in Maumee.

Leith, a National Sales Executive with CareerBuilder.com; Cesarz, the Director of Social Media at Thread; Wise, an attorney at Niehaus and Associates; and Croke, a consultant at Career Bull, shared ideas and strategy on smartly navigating a dramatically different employment landscape. Mike Dreihorst, one of the founding members of Social Media Breakfast Toledo, is the panel moderator.

This is the third in a series of chapters from this panel discussion (April 29, 2010) that includes detail on building personal brand, smartly editing social profiles on LinkedIn, Google, Twitter and Facebook, and the risks and benefits to employees and employers.

Here’s the entire series so far (Part 1, 2, and 3).

Social Media’s Role in the Search for Employment and Employees

2 May

Social Media Breakfast Toledo brought together Don Leith, Kevin Cesarz, Patty Wise and Brandon Croke to examine Social Media’s Role in the Search for Employment and Employees at Thread Information Design in Maumee.

Leith, a National Sales Executive with CareerBuilder.com; Cesarz, the Director of Social Media at Thread; Wise, an attorney at Niehaus and Associates; and Croke, a consultant at Career Bull, shared ideas and strategy on smartly navigating a dramatically different employment landscape.

This is the first in a series of chapters from this panel discussion that will include detail on building personal brand, smartly editing social profiles on LinkedIn, Google, Twitter and Facebook and the risks and benefits to employees and employers.

Navigating the job search with social media

20 Apr

Join Social Media Breakfast Toledo on April 29 at Thread Information Design in Maumee.

Building a personal brand, sharing it in the correct spots and smartly navigating the employment landscape have never been easier because of social media. Unfortunately, there’s that wicked economy. Join us for a conversation about the options and tools for employers, and tactics and personal branding for employees.

  • Social Media Breakfast Toledo No. 8
  • April 29, Thursday (7:30 a.m.)
  • Thread Information Design (1700 Woodlands Dr., Maumee)
  • Panel discussion – Social Media’s Role in the Search for Employment and Employees

In light of the topic and SMB Toledo’s success since 2009, the organization is waiving its registration fee for this event as a thank you for your ideas and continued support. Meet the panel:

  • Don Leith (National Sales Executive with CareerBuilder.com) is responsible for partnering with Fortune 1000 enterprise clients based in Michigan and Northern Ohio to create customized recruiting solutions for top talent and HR processes using social media. Don is a graduate of Michigan State University’s School of Packaging and has worked for Kraft Foods, Georgia-Pacific, and International Paper.
  • Kevin Cesarz (Director of Social Media at Thread Information Design) has been a writer, web editor, and manager for news organizations like The Detroit News, the Minneapolis Star Tribune and toledoblade.com, and is one of the founding members of Social Media Breakfast Toledo. He has used social media and content strategy as a Digital Editor for Campbell-Ewald with clients such as Kaiser Permanente, OnStar and Navy.com.
  • Patty A. Wise (Labor and employment lawyer) is a frequent speaker for state banking associations and serves on the faculty of the Graduate School of Banking at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Patty is a Visiting Professor at The University of Toledo College of Law, teaching employment law as well as civil and political rights and recently completed the second edition of her book, Understanding and Preventing Workplace Retaliation.
  • Brandon Croke (Founder of Career Bull) is a Toledo native and graduate of Ohio University’s College of Business (Bachelors in Marketing, minor in Psychology). He helped to found The Empower Campaign, a hybrid non-profit model run by university students throughout Ohio. He founded Career Bull, a free service to help young professionals find rewarding work, and has been recognized as a 2010 Fulbright Scholar Finalist.

Registration is free but required to help plan for the light breakfast and drinks.

Building personal brand with Johnny Cash

17 Apr
This is a Johnny Cash area

Welcome. Johnny Cash zone.

Hello, I’m Johnny Cash.

Don’t you wish you had an intro like that? Simple, stern and elegant. As the text fades you can hear the baritone, smell the menace, and feel the swagger of that calling card.

That’s a brand . . . built with content, experience, reputation, and style.

Build your personal brand step-by-step so that you can deliver your message in as few words as possible.

  • Your content cache details your professional passion. Your blog is your main thought leadership platform. Express yourself. Tell me in detail how you think, how you build, tell me of your successes, your failures. Analyze and critique the ideas of others. Be playful in tone, shift gears, be the angry God and vent in a thoughtful way. Be honest. Find a fresh way to describe what you love to read, talk and think about. Practice often delivering your message in long form.
  • Your outposts are social media platforms that you maintain like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn. You share great ideas and links here and maintain themes and ideas from your content cache. You engage others with a similar interest. You build them up and challenge them – this makes everyone better. You’re a good neighbor. You share your power tools. Practice often sharing your message and ideas in shorter form.
  • Your elevator speech is the condensed version of your reputation, experience, and goals. Prepare a 90-second, 30-second and one-line version to share your brand. Don’t be a billboard. Create a fresh but serious sliver of what makes you unique in your category. If it’s not reTweetable, try again.

If you’ve developed your content cache and your outposts then this shortest delivery is backed by that same ringing baritone.

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